Gandhi Jayanti Quotes in English

All the religions of the world, while they may differ in other respects, unitedly proclaim that nothing lives in this world but Truth.


Morality is the basis of things and truth is the substance of all morality.


Real suffering, bravely borne, melts even a heart of stone. Such is the potency of suffering. And there lies the key to Satyagraha.


But for my faith in God, I should have been a raving maniac.


The first condition of humaneness is a little humility and a little diffidence about the correctness of one’s conduct and a little receptiveness.


Where love is, there God is also.


Nonviolence is not a quality to be evolved or expressed to order. It is an inward growth depending for sustenance upon intense individual effort.


When anything assumes the strength of a creed, it becomes selfsustained and derives the needed support from within.


Each one has to find his peace from within. And peace to be real must be unaffected by outside circumstances.


Healthy discontent is the prelude to progress.


Commonsense is the realised sense of proportion.


Golden fetters are no less galling to a selfrespecting man theniron ones; the sting lies in the fetters, not in the metal.


Breach of promise is a base surrender of truth.


I reject any religious doctrine that does not appeal to reason and is in conflict with morality.


Gentleness, selfsacrifice and generosity are the exclusive possession of no one race or religion.


Each one prays to God according to his own light.


Breach of promise is no less an act of insolvency than a refusal to pay one’s debt.


The law of sacrifice is uniform throughout the world. To be effective it demands the sacrifice of the bravest and the most spotless.


Man becomes great exactly in the degree in which he works for the welfare of his fellowmen.


We may have our private opinions but why should they be a bar to the meeting of hearts?


I would heartily welcome the union of East and West provided it is not based on brute force.


I saw that nations like individuals could only be made through the agony of the Cross and in no other way. Joy comes not out of infliction of pain on others but out of pain voluntarily borne by oneself.


An ounce of practice is worth more then tons of preaching.


To me art in order to be truly great must, like the beauty of Nature, be universal in its appeal. It must be simple in its presentation and direct in its expression, like the language of Nature.


God sometimes does try to the uttermost those whom he wishes to bless.


When restraint and courtesy are added to strength, the latter becomes irresistible.